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July 30, 2007

Richard Florida

Getting Ahead

« Our Infrastructure is Old ... | Main | Big Corporation on Campus »

Kevin Stolarick of the Creative Class Group and Lisa Taber of FortiusOne have paired up to develop a series of 'heat maps' that show the hottest places in the country based on your lifestage and some preselected criteria.  The maps allow you to zoom in on specific parts of the country or see how your current city compares to others.

Each map shows the best regions based on a variety of criteria all evenly weighted.  In this case, "Getting Ahead" shows the combination of cities that rate the best based on:
    Tolerance (higher is better)
    Growth
    Number of Creative Class young & single in the region
 
The criteria used for each map are listed & described in the region to the left of the map. 

Only data for major US cities (populations above 250,000) has been included.

The map itself is a heat map overlay on a standard Google Map.  So, all of the usual Google map features are available: pan, zoom in , zoom out, change the background, etc...

The "hotter" -- yellow areas are those places that do the best on the combined criteria.

Getting Ahead Map

Come back Monday to see next week's map: Starting a Family

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Comments

Michael Bernstein

Does 'number' of CC singles refewr to absolute couint, or the percentage of the population?

The latter is what I would consider more important.

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