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October 03, 2007

Richard Florida

Creative Europe

« Rural Poverty | Main | Creative Class Debates »

Check out this new paper on "The Creative Class and Regional Growth in Europe" by Ron Boschma and Michael Fritsch from the Max-Planck Institute of Economics in Germany. They've  assembled cool data on the creative class in 450 city-regions in Europe. And then they used that to identify major creative class centers, the factors which attract the creative class, and effects of the creative class on regional economic development Their findings show that the creative class measures (that is occupations) significantly outperform human capital in economic growth.  They also find that the creative class is highly concentrated in Europe.  Interestingly they find that urbanization per se is not an important determinant of creative class locations, but rather that active arts and culture scenes (measure by the bohemian index) and a climate of openness and tolerance play key roles. This is careful work by an independent and objective team of scholars which provides powerful confirmation of the power of the creative class theory in explaining regional outcomes.

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Creative Europe:

» Creative Europe from Putting people first
Via Richard Floridas blog, I found out about a new paper on The Creative Class and Regional Growth in Europe by Ron Boschma and Michael Fritsch from the Max-Planck Institute of Economics in Germany. Florida summarises it as foll... [Read More]

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